"Song of Granite" celebrates Irish music and culture

"Song of Granite" celebrates Irish music and culture

“Song of Granite” (2017) tells the stirring life story of one of the 20th century’s greatest proponents of traditional Irish music —Seosamh Ó hÉanaí, known locally as Joe Éinniú or Joe Heaney. The film was shown at the Browning Cinema on Thursday, March 22. The event was sponsored by the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies.

1968, Resistance + Reaching Higher Ground

1968, Resistance + Reaching Higher Ground

“Do they know about Martin Luther King?” This soft aside, caught by microphone above the din of a roiling crowd in Indianapolis, is the beginning of Senator Robert Fitzgerald Kennedy’s recorded address to the city’s African-American community on April 4, 1968. Then Kennedy clearly turns to face that microphone and asks, “Could you lower those signs, please? I have some very sad news for all of you and that is Martin Luther King was shot and killed tonight in Memphis, Tennessee.” read more

Filmmaker Series: John Little

Filmmaker Series: John Little

More Than a Word examines the cultural appropriation of Native American names and iconography, specifically by corporations (e.g., Washington R*dskins) and educational institutions. The efforts to remove these mascots and brand images stems, in part, from the National Congress of American Indians, which in the 1940s started organized efforts to improve depictions of Native Americans…

Filmmaker Series: Chico Pereira

Filmmaker Series: Chico Pereira

Donkeyote has a deeply personal touch you don’t always find in that library of films, though—and not simply because Chico Pereira focuses the film on a relative, here his uncle Manolo’s quixotic attempt to bring his beloved donkey from Spain to the U.S.A. to ride the 2200-mile Trail of Tears. There’s a warmth there one…