The October Rundown with guest Chris Becker

By DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, October 1, 2018

[About a 4 MIN read]

Establishing Shot is thrilled to again have an amazing guest sitting down with Ted and Ricky to run through what the Browning Cinema is offering this October. That guest would be the one and the only Professor Chris Becker, who teaches in the Department of Film, Television, and Theatre here at the University of Notre Dame, runs the extremely popular Notre Dame Film Society, and can be heard on her own supersmart podcast Aca-Media. She’s joining Ted and Ricky to run through what is, despite Fall Break, a very busy month at the Browning. Also, Ricky will be donning Canadian thrift store duds and talking about the fun (or not so fun but very, very good) films he caught at the Toronto International Film Festival.

On the New at the Browning front, One Vote, a documentary depicting Election Day 2016 in different places around the United States, is screening with the director Christine Woodhouse scheduled to appear. That’s complemented by Valeska Grisebach’s return to feature directing in Western, Boots Riley’s satirical Sorry to Bother You, and a documentary about L’Arche communities seen in Summer in the Forest.

Operation: Frankenstein paces menacingly forward with the Franco allegory The Spirit of the Beehive, Mel Brooks’ seminal comedy Young Frankenstein, and National Theatre Live’s production of Frankenstein wherein Jonny Lee Miller and Benedict Cumberbatch take turns playing both Dr. Frankenstein and the Creature depending on the performance (we’ll be showing one of each iteration).

Professor Pfinklepfunder is showing up in October to make some movies that families can enjoy for $1, including the legitimately delightful Paddington 2, the legitimately cool The Nightmare Before Christmas, and the legitimately horrible The Garbage Pail Kids Movie.

The Truth and Fiction iteration of the Learning Beyond the Classics series continues with Werner Herzog’s found-footage documentary Grizzly Man, Michael Moore’s takedown of GM and corporate greed in Roger & Me, the history of the ACT UP movement in How to Survive a Plague, and has the (very, very real) The Blair Witch Project to close out the month on Halloween.

Lastly, the second GlobaLGBTQ+ Film Festival drops this October with last year’s Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film A Fantastic Woman (Chile); a probing documentary about imperialism, transphobia, and crime in Call Her Ganda (The Philippines/U.S.A.) with director PJ Raval scheduled to appear; a not-yet-released film from about riches-to-rags called The Heiresses (Paraguay); Rafiki (Kenya) a standout at this year’s Cannes Film Festival that received backlash by its national film censors; and lastly Pride (United Kingdom) about the protest work that brought together LGBTQ+ activists and unions in Wales during the Thatcher years.

As always, big thanks to Kevin Krizmanich for his sound engineering work and Staci Stickovich for giving Establishing Shot its online presence. Stay tuned later in the month to see if Chris adapted (hint!) to the set and stuck around for a Top Three episode.